Saturday, 29 November 2014

PAST PAPER (DRAMA: 2011 SUPPLEMENTARY)

11. YEAR 2011(Supplementary) 
Attempt FOUR questions in all. Question No. 1 is compulsory. All questions carry equal marks.
1. Explain with reference to the context any THREE of the following passages:
(i) Oh, for my sins, I've always spent money like a lunatic. I married a man who only knew how to get into debts --- killed himself drinking champagne --- oh, how he drank! I fell in love with someone else - God, what a misfortune! We had an affair.
(ii) Yes. Good heavens, I always looking forward to it all so much. To seeing you play hostess to a select circle! By Jove! What? Ah, well, for the time being we shall have to make do with each other's company.
(iii) Gentlemen I don't know what came over me. Forget all I said. (more and more his old self) I don't remember exactly what it was, but you may be sure there wasn't a word of truth in it.
(iv) Oh, no. You soon spot them behind this counter. You get a fair indication from the way they pay their bill. That shows if they respect our way of life, or if they're just out to make trouble by ruining people into debt.
(v) A human race with shambles around in a pearly haze of superstition and old saws, too ignorant to develop its own powers, will never be able to develop those powers of nature which you people are revealing to it.
2. How far do you think that the last scene of Bond's play THE SEA is dramatically effective?
3. "I have used Christianity as mythology in the play WAITING FOR GODOT'. What dramatic purpose does Christian mythology serve in the play?
4. "Again and again his characters speak of trivialities at a time when their thoughts are quite clearly engaged on something quite different" Discuss with reference to THE CHERRY ORCHARD.
5. Discuss the dramatic significance of symbols in the play HEDDA GABLER.
6. How far do you think that the issues and concerns raised in Brecht's GALILEO GALILI relevant for us today?
7. Discuss the dramatic significance of the following.
(i) The opening scene of THE SEA.
(ii) The character of Trofimov. 

No comments:

Post a Comment